Tag Archives: Digital Distribution

Some advice from a collector.

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With some out-of-town family visiting, and some heavy work days, I unfortunately won’t have a review this week. So instead I’ve decided to do something a little bit different with commentary. It’s no secret that I love all kinds of games, especially some old ones. Some of you may wonder just how to get your hands on some of the games I’ve reviewed. Here are some small tips I’ve found over the years. Maybe they’ll help you in rounding out your game collections.

Keep everything. (At first)

Well, I should be a bit more specific. That stack of old games in the cellar. That tub of old games in a closet. Don’t just toss those. Carefully go through them, and replay them. Unless you’re in a situation where you honestly have no room of course. Then you’ll want to either research the values, and get some money back, or donate them to a charitable cause. But if you’re going to build a collection, look at what you already own. Keep the stuff you really enjoy, or what you’re intrigued by. You’ll probably even find some stuff you don’t remember buying, or getting. It’s the perfect time to experience them.

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Focus.

When you’re just starting out, don’t try to get every little thing you get your hands on. Rather focus on one or two platforms. There are a few approaches you can take. A lot of people like to start with something they grew up with. For older hobbyists that usually means something like the Atari 2600, Commodore 64 or the NES. Some of the younger blood may shoot for PlayStation, and Nintendo 64 games. Nostalgia makes stuff  more palatable when you start out. Plus buying everything you stumble upon will become a problem if you only have so much room.

Network.

If you find an independent store you like, don’t be afraid to talk up the staff. (When they’re not busy. I cannot stress this enough. If there’s a line, a parent asking them about a game. A lot of stock to put out. Don’t bother them when they have a lot of stuff to do.) When there’s a free moment, on a Tuesday afternoon you can build a rapport. Just by talking about games, or other stuff. Over time they may find out you’re collecting primarily Sega Master System stuff, so when something good gets traded in they may ask you if you want to buy it first. As you’re a regular, who buys a fair amount from them. And likewise, you may discover an employee digs Tiger Handhelds. So when you find one at a yard sale for a few dollars you let them have it. (So long as the store lets them accept gifts.) It’s a nice gesture that lets them know you appreciate their professionalism, and stellar service.

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You can also use social media to find a trade group in your area. Then you can meet other local players, and collectors in your area. There’s a good chance someone will have a game or accessory you’ve been looking for, and they may be willing to give it to you for a bit less than the average online or store price on it. And you’ll want to spread that around. If you’re looking to unload something, give a fair price on it. And be open to trading. Sometimes you’ll get a few really cool pieces for one thing you have that isn’t so easy to come by. More important than your collection, will be all of the friends you make in the process. Real friends who care about you as a person, and vice versa. The hobby isn’t merely about amassing stuff. It’s about having people to share it with. Don’t discount the friends you make online either!

Don’t be a completionist.

This is a huge one for anybody who collects anything. I once mentioned this in an interview with Chasing HappiNES I did last year (Check out his channel, it’s pretty great!) but it bears repeating. Completionism can get really bad, really fast. Because it can become an obsession. It happens in every hobby. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, often times there are variances in collectibles. An example I like to bring up is the 2002 iteration of Mattel’s Masters Of The Universe toy line. Not only did collectors have a vast roster to try to find, but there were several versions of He-Man, and Skeletor released. Battle Sound He-Man, Jungle Attack He-Man, Smash Blade He-Man, to name a few! But it didn’t end there because many of the toys were released on cards that were written in English, as well as on other cards  that were written in multiple languages. But that still isn’t the end, because you had to factor in that there were minor paint differences, and chase versions of most of the characters. To be a completionist in that line meant not only buying each character, but buying them two or three times for the card differences, paint differences, etc. After all, if you wanted to own everything in the line, that meant all of those variants too!

Believe it or not, it’s the same when game collecting. If you look at the Atari 2600 you’ll find several versions of most of its first-party games. Early games were numbered with a text label. Then they were re-published without the numbers. Then they were published again, with the box art on a black background. Then a silver background. Some of them even came out again, on a red background. Even third-party games were often released multiple times, on different labels.

It doesn’t end with the Atari 2600 though. Many NES games, Super NES, and Genesis games came out with alternate boxes, and labels. Add multiple regions, variants of those regions, and you have yourself a ton of clutter. Instead of all of that, focus on getting good games, you know you’ll play.

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Embrace importing.

Let’s face it. Some games are pricey. Insanely pricey. If you want a legitimate copy of Mega Man 7 for the Super NES but don’t have the $170 or more, there is another way. Getting Rock Man 7 for the Super Famicom for $30. It’s the Japanese version. It can be played on an American Super NES with the assistance of a pair of pliers, and five minutes. Truth be told many pricey games are somewhat affordable if you import them from other territories. Now, in some cases running them is pretty easy. In others not so much. So you’ll want to do some research. But another reason to get into importing, is that you’ll be able to play a ton of stuff that was never released Stateside. Really good stuff!

There’s no shame in Digital Distribution.

Some games are not only pricey, they’re impossible to find, and have no international release. Other games have rights issues, that get cleared up, but only temporarily. Also, there’s the fact that some of us have no room to store every platform ever. Thanks to services like Steam, and GoG on PC you can get some of those old games digitally. If you own a Wii the Nintendo Wii Shop Channel is still up for the system. That means you can still buy some TurboGrafx 16, Genesis, Master System, games. The current E-shop on the Wii U, and 3DS is still going too. Of course there are also the Xbox, and PSN stores for those platforms. None of these stores are perfect, and there are some issues that DD doesn’t solve. You can’t download the games again if the stores close, and you can’t resell them if you don’t like them. But it is a convenient, and affordable option for some titles. As with importing, some games are much less expensive digitally. Some can only be purchased digitally.

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Take a risk on mystery games.

Cartridges for some platforms are decades old. While you generally want to have loose games in the best possible condition, sometimes you have no choice but to buy a game with a torn label, video store sticker, or crayon, or marker on it. Sometimes because it’s one of those elusive titles. But sometimes you’ll find a cartridge for your system of choice with no label sitting in a store. Usually insanely cheap because the staff have no idea what game it is. Buy it. When you get it home, and slap it in your 2600 that blank Activision cartridge could be another copy of Pitfall or it could be a rare copy of Double Dragon! It could also wind up being a counterfeit, but if you got it from a reputable store it should be refundable. Which reminds me.

Make sure you’re getting authentic games.

Bring the proper tools with you when you go shopping. A reputable store should let you take apart that Super NES Game Pak if you’re about to drop $100 on Chrono Trigger. There are a wealth of great resources out there on how to spot these ‘Pretend’ games. The YouTube channel Metal Jesus Rocks put together an excellent video about it. You should definitely check out. Handheld games seem to get hit the hardest, but there have been counterfeit cartridges as long as there have been video game consoles.  It’s unfortunate, but you’re going to need to do the research. Especially if a game you want isn’t cheap.

Get out of your comfort zone.

Maybe it’s a series you never bothered to look at. Maybe it’s a genre you never gave a chance. When you go thrift store shopping, pick up that RTS sitting unopened for $3. Try out that obscure game nobody has ever heard of. Many times you’ll be pleasantly surprised. Other times you might be disappointed. But you can say you’ve experienced a wider variety of experiences. You could also discover a developer whose work you enjoy.

Go where nobody else is going.

I live in a small state, where big towns, and cities are surrounded by towns composed of miles of woods. During the spring, and summer when yard sales are most prevalent these are the places I’ll have the most luck. Why? Because most people don’t think to drive an hour away to a town with no major businesses. But they should. Usually these residents are just looking to get rid of things too. They’re not interested in making top dollar. They’re just looking to get it out of the house. They also don’t want to go an hour into town just to recycle things, or donate things. If your area has any passing similarities to mine, it’s a tactic you may want to employ for yourself. These are the places you’ll have a higher chance of finding a bundle of games, or an old console or computer for cheap. Just make sure you max out the gas tank before heading out. Getting stranded in a town on a barely traveled road isn’t fun.

I also have luck on more recent platforms when going to stores nobody expects to have things. Sometimes an office supply store, home care store, or department store (that deals mainly in apparel ) will have games for seasonal impulse items. After that season ends, they’re put on clearance to move. So next time you need a new pair of shorts in the summer, or are in sudden need of glassware, take a look while you’re there.

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Don’t be afraid to go third-party on Amazon.

I’ve gotten a number of good deals from third-party vendors on the site. Commando for the Atari 2600 with the manual being the best one.  But I’ve gotten other stuff too, like a never opened Sega Arcade Smash Hits bundle for IBM/PC (DOS). You almost never see those loose. Let alone new. Now this does require some research on your part. You have to check the customer ratings, and you might have to contact the seller before plunking down the money. Sometimes  you’ll find a particular seller doesn’t primarily deal in games, and may have a detail wrong. Remember to keep all of the sales info, and copies of any conversations in case you have to return it. And take photos if it comes in a vastly different condition than described, or if it’s a counterfeit. There’s some risk involved here, but it can be mitigated with good practices. Of course if something sounds too good to be true it probably is. If you see a $300 game listed for $5 there should definitely be some skepticism on your part.

Don’t lose sight of what’s important.

Partaking in any hobby is fun, and can even be healthy. It keeps your mind working, and gets you out of the house. But if adding that copy of M.U.S.H.A. to your Genesis collection is going to mean being late on a utility bill, or eschewing a financial obligation you should wait on getting the seminal shoot ’em up. This might sound obvious, but if you’re missing rent, or can’t walk through your home without tripping over something you may want to downsize, and re-evaluate a bit. You can replace items. You can’t replace people.

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Don’t think of your collection as an investment.

Sure, some games are rare, and expensive. But not all of them will stay that way. If you happen to have something that is sought after, and pricey good for you. You may be able to find a buyer, and put that cool $300 toward this month’s mortgage. But unless you’re running a business,  don’t look at your heavy hitters as bankable guarantees. Actually, even if you own a business you can’t count on someone waltzing in with $700 to drop on your copy of Flintstones Surprise At Dino Peak. Look at your collection for what it is; a fun appreciation for the history of the medium. A bunch of titles you can revisit. Perhaps with friends, family, other players, and younger people interested in what came before.

There will always be some titles that hold value. But in the 1990’s everyone thought their copies of Superman #75, and X-Men #1 were going to be akin to winning the lottery. They weren’t. X-Men #1 had one of the highest print runs of any comic book ever, and only the first print run of The death of Superman was ever worth anything. Plus the poly bag it shipped in wasn’t acid free. So ironically, only the ones people actually took out to read once, are in better condition. Even those, only fetch around $10 these days. So if you bought one in 1993, almost 24 years later, that’s a profit margin of around $8.

Don’t buy new releases expecting them to make you wealthy. Yes, it is true most of the more valuable old games came out in the final years of a given platform’s prominence. But that doesn’t mean in 15 years the average person is going to give you the money they were going to put down on a car for a copy of Pepsi Invaders either. They could. But that shouldn’t be a foregone conclusion in your mind. If you do sell a game out of your vault, don’t cheat yourself. But don’t expect to get top dollar either. Sometimes things happen that throw a wrench into such get rich quick schemes anyway. When Devil’s Third was quietly released in limited quantities scalpers were charging double the MSRP to the tune of $120. Not long after, a second printing happened, and today, a new copy is a mere $40. A fair number of people are stuck with a bunch of extra copies out there. All because they thought it was a guaranteed meal ticket. It wasn’t.

Have fun.

Hobbies, are supposed to be an outlet. A break from the stress, and anxieties of every day life. So have fun. Share photos of that new pick up. Schedule a day to invite people over to play some Colecovision together. Stay up late one night after work in multiplayer with friends. Take the significant other out with you game hunting. Spread the joy around.

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A Steam walkthrough for newcomers

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(I originally wrote this for the defunct Retro Retreat. It’s been edited, and updated.)

Since it’s inception in 2003, Valve’s Steam service has come a long way. Starting out as an inconvenient, buggy, necessary evil for Hal-Life 2, it grew into a huge storefront, and destination for the biggest PC games. It adapted to the concerns, and needs of a community going so far as to create it’s own. Eventually dwarfing online store services in the console market in terms of members. It became famous for week-long door buster deals during the summer, and winter months igniting sales on existing games during what have always been lull periods for releases. How many times have you been on a video game message board to see threads of boasting huge sales? How many times have you heard friends talk about getting some of your favorite games on their computer for a lot less than $60, and legitimately?

 Yet for a variety of reasons good, or bad many out there still haven’t forayed into the world of Steam. This article is going to cover creating an account, utilizing the client, and showing a few things that some who have used the service may not yet know about. I chose to put out a Steam article because of the fact not a lot of blogs or outlets have really talked about it much other than mentioning when a major AAA release is coming to it or an indie darling is coming about. Despite having millions of subscribers, when I’m in public I  still meet a lot of gamers who have yet to try Valve’s service out. I will be going through the service on a Windows machine, but the service is available to those on Apple Macintosh or any of the Linux distributions.

The first step to setting up a Steam account is really simple. From any computer with an internet connection go to the Steam website (Steampowered.com), and click Install Steam at the top right corner. A box will ask you if you want to save or open the installer. Click save, and once it’s downloaded then you can proceed to run the installer. Once you have Steam installed, you can run the client by clicking the shortcut if you chose to have it on your desktop or start screen (If you are on Windows 8). Otherwise simply go with the standard Start->All Programs->Steam->Steam path from your Start button.

When you first fire up the client it’s going to take you through a sign up process. This is generally straightforward, asking for typical info for business or security reasons most websites you use every day have probably asked for. All of this will be tied to an email address of your choosing.

The reason for this is so that you can get security checks, lost password information or email alerts from Valve should you ever need it. Once you have an email address selected, it will also ask you for an account name (Which will be different from your online name), and a password for you to log onto Steam. Some people like to check mark the software to remember their password. But generally this isn’t recommended, especially if you are using a laptop at a public hotspot. Remember that all of your game, and content purchases will be tied to your Steam account. So if the password is stolen, the thief has access to your digital library. Steam does have some safeguards in place in case this ever happens. But to better avoid such a scenario it’s recommended you memorize, and type in your password when you want to log onto the service.

You can also access your account from any computer with an internet connection, so do feel free to do so. For instance, if you are on a netbook in a coffee shop (or other place with a hotspot), and have the sudden urge to play Peggle, you can log on to Steam from there as well. Steam will build a list of trusted devices for your account with it’s Steam Guard feature. You will be emailed a code with every device that tries to log on, so if someone tries to do it on a system you don’t own they will be denied unless they also have access to your email account to get the specific code.

With all of that out-of-the-way, it’s time to customize your account. Here you can choose a screen name for your friends, and opponents in games to see you under. You can also upload a photo or other picture to your account to use as an avatar. You can also change this at any time. So if you become bored, or begin to worry it may offend someone it can be swapped. You can also post a website under your info so if you want someone to be able to visit it you can do so. Then when people see your profile they can visit your site if they wish.

Many people like to put a description or a list of likes, and dislikes here while others like to leave them blank. Just like Facebook, it’s entirely up to you how open or private you would like to be. Please use proper judgment though, as you don’t want to have your private phone number, or company secrets, or social security numbers or other stuff that should remain private floating around the internet. Once you have a profile set up it’s time to start adding friends if you have any, who are already on the service. Simply go to the top of the screen, and click the Friends tab. Under that, click Add Friend, and you will be able to search by screen name or email. Once you find them, click Add Friend, and an invitation will be sent to them. Once they get it, they can confirm they know you, and will be on your friends list. The friends list client is a lot more than just a, well list of people.

The friends list works much like your list on Xbox Live, Playstation Network, or (For us old timers) X-Fire. You can talk to them via typing, or by talking on a headset. Right clicking on their names allows you to invite them to join a chat, or a group. Groups are nice for fans of certain games, or other fandoms to get together on Steam. You will find Steam groups for just about anything within reason. Groups will allow you to make other friends or at least players you can get along with.

Now that you have an account, and a friends list it’s time to navigate your layout. Steam has four main areas noted at the top: STORE. LIBRARY. COMMUNITY. followed by whatever screen name you went with. The store is usually the default screen for most people who sign into Steam. It is here you are greeted with a scrolling pane of the latest releases. Sometimes you may also get pop ups of the latest releases, or sales. You can either click next on each one if you’re interested or simply click close, and it won’t bother you again. The store tab allows you to shop for games. You can use the search function to find a particular title, or you can sort by price, or genre. You can even look by developer or publisher. On the side panel you can also find a button to sort for games under $10 or under $5 for those times when you want something new to play, but don’t have a lot of disposable income. Valve will often times do a special mid-week deal on Wednesdays to pique interest, and many times on Weekends have special two-day deals where you can play a full priced game for free, and then buy it at a discounted rate if you really enjoy it.

But the biggest hype in the Steam community is during the summer, and leading up to early winter a second time when Valve runs annual season sales. Particularly the summer sale. During this sale each day games will be slashed 50%-90% off. Before you go thinking it’s just to unload unwanted keys for drivel nobody wants to play there are a lot of great deals every year. Blockbuster games, indie games, and everything in between. Sometimes during these runs you will see publisher packs discounted too. These packs generally include every game the publisher has released on Steam. Other packs will be multiplayer packs, where a single user can buy a bundle of keys to be given away to friends. Games like Payday 2 really benefit from this as the discounted rate gets a sale from fans. But also legally, and affordably gets their on the fence friends to check out a game they might not normally buy on their own.

Season sales also involve the community by raffling off content for hitting metrics. Get an achievement in one title, get a card. Get a friend to play Co-Op with you, get a card. Write a comment or recommendation or commendation of a title you played, get a card. Collect so many cards, get a badge that boosts your Steam profile rating. These contests make an already great sale into something fun, and community driven. Plus a lot of the community driven things that occur during these periods don’t require buying things. So it’s just more of an incentive to log in, and play with your friends.

Buying games is pretty easy. Once you go to a game’s page you click on Add To Cart. Clicking on your cart then takes you to the checkout. Here you can choose to buy the title for yourself, or to gift the title to someone else. Electing to gift the title will let you either email a notification to someone, or you can simply pick someone from your friends list. You can also add the gift to your inventory to hang onto to be gifted later. This is a wonderful way to buy for birthdays or holidays that are a ways off.

 Steam will even let you know if a friend already owns the title so you can back out of the transaction, and choose something else to gift. At this point whether you’re buying for yourself or someone else, Steam will ask for your billing information. Here is where you enter your address, and credit card information. Steam will then let you save the information  for future purchases, or like your password, you can leave the box un-ticked.

It should also be noted that Steam features a buying option for those without a credit card: The Steam Wallet. Steam Wallet allows you to purchase gift cards at physical brick, and mortar stores to be used on Steam. They can be found at Best Buy, Target, 7 Eleven or GameStop, and they may turn up at other retailers as well. All of the cards have a code (Except at GameStop which we’ll get to in a moment.) that can be redeemed. Simply click under the Games tab, pick Redeem Steam Wallet Code, and type it in. In the case of GameStop, rather than print the code on the actual cards, wallet codes are printed on the receipt. Adding the wallet code works the same way. If you have any money in your Steam wallet, it becomes your default payment. So game purchases will come out of the wallet until empty. Once empty, Steam will then ask for credit card information again.

Video games, and other content purchased from Steam are forever tied to your account. As mentioned earlier, you can access your content from any system Steam is installed on. Steam also has an offline mode. So if you have a spotty connection, or simply want to play a single player game on your laptop while camping you can choose to. All you have to do is click Go Offline under the Steam tab before going out, and about. It should also be noted that any physical retail disc version of a game also sold on Steam will be added to your account. Simply choose Activate A Product On Steam, punch in the Key, and the service will authenticate it. Once authenticated you can either download the title or install it from your physical disc.

Now that you have some titles under your belt it’s time to customize your library. When you click your Library tab you will notice a few symbols toward the upper right. These allow you to change the layout of your library. You can choose (Left to right) a simplified list version (With descriptions on the right for each title), a modified list version, or Steam Grid version. (Pictured). Going with Steam Grid gives your library a look similar to those found on Xbox Live, or Apple iTunes. This layout is by far the most popular one, and is recommended for anyone other than those running on fairly underpowered computers. There is also a fourth layout called Big Picture mode.

Steam Big Picture mode is intended for gamers using a Home Theatre PC. What’s a Home Theatre PC some of you may ask? A HTPC is a computer used in lieu of typical media players, and set-top boxes with a TV set. Not only are they popular with some of the do it yourself crowd, who like to buy parts, and assemble their own computer. But some manufacturers actually sell pre built ones along with their regular desktop lines. HTPC’s typically have midrange to top-tier hardware. Great processors, graphics cards, and fast storage. Some even include Blu-Ray drives. HTPC’s also come mostly in cases that resemble rack mount stereo equipment, or set-top boxes. Some of the Steam boxes take this route as well. With a HTPC hooked up to a HDTV, Big Picture mode allows players to navigate Steam with an Xbox 360 (or comparable) gamepad.

Steam Big Picture mode changes the entire look of Steam. You can browse not only the store or your library or friends list with the twin sticks, but the mode also features a web browser too. The web browser controls well, and displays most websites with little to no trouble. Typing in web addresses or chatting with friends is also seamless. Rather than pull up an onscreen keyboard the way every console since the NES has, Steam Big Picture has a wheel like display. It can look daunting at first, but the color coded letters are fairly easy to follow, especially if using an Xbox 360 pad. To exit the mode, Steam entirely, or even restart or shut off your computer, you can highlight the power button, and pull up a shutdown menu.

Steam also allows gamers to run titles not originally intended for release on Steam. Doing this is very simple. Under the Games tab select Add Non Steam Game To My Library. From here you will see a list box of everything installed on your computer, much like the one featured in Windows’ Add Or Remove Programs option under it’s control panel. Once you check mark, and apply the title you want to add it will appear on your list or grid of titles. But it doesn’t end there! If you are using the Grid mode, you can then right-click on the new, but bland icon, and pick your own custom artwork for the button! All you have to do is make sure you have the custom button made up to be applied. Simply pick Set Custom Image after right clicking the icon, and then browse for your custom button. JPEG, PNG, or TGA formats can be used at a resolution of 460×215.

The other major area of Steam of importance is the Steam Community tab. This is where you can visit the latest news that outlets are bringing up, as well as game hubs. Game hubs allow users to share screenshots, files, and discuss the titles they love. Every title available for download on Steam has it’s own community hub. There is also a Steam Community Market where users can trade custom content for Steam Wallet credit. It’s an entire sub economy for enthusiasts. Many games support this area most notably Team Fortress 2, and it’s hat crafting. The most successful people in the community have actually been able to make a living at it.

Steam Trading Cards are also a big component of the market. Most of the new releases on the service over the last two years support them. As you play these titles, over time they drop cards you can use for profile or community uses. Each card belongs to a set. Half of which are generally dropped off to you by playing the game they are associated with. To get the remaining cards in the set you can trade with friends, or buy them in the Steam Marketplace. Completing sets allows you to craft badges, that in turn boost your Steam Level which is kind of like Xbox Gamerscore. It gives you bragging rights amongst your friends. But it can also get you custom game themed backgrounds for your profile, along with emoticons for use while instant messaging friends.

However, if you’re a player who doesn’t care about that aspect of the service, you can sell your cards on the marketplace. Most of the cards will be nickel, and dime pricing. But occasionally you may get a rarer foil version of a card that goes for more. Sale events can also drop special cards. Selling these on the marketplace for change adds up. So many players will sell the cards for wallet credit, and use the money on new games instead of crafting badges with the trading cards.

t your thing, you may want to look at Steam Greenlight. Greenlight is something everyone should look at once in a while, because it allows community input as to what titles may eventually find their way to the Steam store for actual purchase. One of the best examples of Greenlight bringing a wonderful title to Steam is Giana Sisters: Twisted Dreams. This excellent platformer was green lit after a very successful Kickstarter. Steam users can vote on what upcoming titles they want to see hit the store. There are thousands of titles to vote for, from independent creators to studios with a product publishers may have rejected. If enough folks vote for a title, Valve puts it into their pipeline, and begins the process of working with the creators on how to get it on the Steam store.

Eventually this portion of Steam is supposed to be retired. But for now players can use it to try to keep good games in the store, and bad games out. Sadly, it’s really about the only thing you can do aside from posting reviews. Fortunately, Steam does allow you to do so on every game’s store page. So if you have played a title you loved, and want to implore people to buy it you can do that. You can also tell people to stay away from stinkers you’ve played as well.

Finally, it’s time to go back to the first option a second. Click on Steam, and pick Settings.

This will bring up a box with several tabs. We’ll briefly cover each of these. The first tab is called Account. This is where you should go if your email address ever needs to change or you want to change your password. You can also manage Steam Guard protection as well as choose any Beta participation with the Steam client. If you choose to opt in, you will get any updates to the client that aren’t finalized. You can always change this on or off, but participating in betas does let you get a peek at what may be coming down the pike.

The second tab is the Friends tab. This tab goes further than the friend option on the top of the mainline Steam screen. It gives you the option to change sound tones, let you know if someone logs on,  lets you post time stamps during conversations, as well as notifications, and sounds options.

Third on the list is the Interface tab. This tab lets you change language settings in addition to whether or not you want Steam in your startup menu, what custom skins (If any) you would like to use with the client, and what screen you see first upon logging on. You can even choose to default into Big Picture mode if you wish.

The In-Game tab features options for the Steam overlay. The overlay is a feature all of the Steam purchased software titles, and some non Steam titles allow players to use. Basically, it covers the game or program being used for quick access to the Steam community, or friends tabs. It’s handy when you’re gaming, and a friend needs to talk to you at the same time. You can also choose a Steam Browser homepage here.

The Downloads + Cloud tab is where your bandwidth options go. Here you can change the speed if you ever upgrade/downgrade your internet service, and you can also alter where your Steam games are installed. Honestly it’s best if you use the default locations for your Steam installs as to keep everything running smoothly. But if you ever do change from Cable service to DSL service for instance, changing that here can better optimize Steam.

The final tab is the Voice tab. This controls the Voice over IP settings in Steam. If you find yourself playing a lot of games with friends, and don’t  want to go through the setup process of third-party VOIP clients like Ventrillo, Mumble, or C3 it’s a great feature. For non Steam games however you still may want to use one of those third-party clients, as not every non Steam title works with the Steam VOIP or overlay.

So that’s the basics for Steam. Feel free to tweak, or poke deeper into the service. Some of the things covered here may change in later updates, but not so much it renders this guide unusable. Hopefully you’ve enjoyed reading through this, and found it a great resource for your first foray into the #1 digital storefront in PC gaming. Keep an eye out for the mega bargains during the seasonal sales, make some friends, and enjoy all of the great stuff Valve’s service has to offer.