GALAX-I-BIRDS Review

Well if you thought last week’s review was pretty over the top, here’s another Commodore 64 game from Firebird. Galax-I-birds (or Galaxibirds depending on who you ask) is a preposterous shoot ’em up that lampoons Namco’s classic Galaxian. It’s a joke game, but it’s a joke game made with some serious effort behind it.

PROS: It gets pretty hilarious. Solid play control.

CONS: You have to survive to get to the hilarity. Which isn’t easy to do.

WHAT?: If you can survive beyond hilarity there are Easter eggs.

Galaxibirds, much like Galaxian, is a very simple game. It can be summed up in a single sentence. You fly a space ship, through space, shooting birds. But that would be a disservice to the game. Released in 1986 by Firebird, Galaxibirds is a precursor to games like Parodius. Parody games that mock the absurdity of games by somehow being even more absurd.

When you first fire up the game, you’re greeted with a giant bird for the title screen. Press the space bar, and you’ll be greeted with a bunch of beeps orchestrated in a way to simulate chirping. This goes on while you see the instructions flash on the screen as credits scroll in the background. Behind all of that is the game’s attract mode.

Once you have selected the number of players, you’re ready to begin. A giant swath of swans will make a run for your ship. Blow them all away, and you move onto the next species. And the next, and the next. Right out of the gate you’ll be running into strange, and stupid ideas. After all, who would buy birds breathing in space? Let alone running kamikaze style into fighter ships?

But if you can survive beyond the waves of birds, you will have to fight waves of comedic genius. There are around 8 different ornithological species before doing so. Do note that each wave gets not only a new pattern, but a faster speed as well. The longer a ship survives the faster things also get. Because of that, a lot of people might not get to see the added jokes Galaxibirds has up its sleeve.

And these jokes lampoon early arcade gaming. If you do get to them, and are familiar with the top arcade cabinets of the early 80’s you’ll laugh. Trust me, the screenshots I have in this review do not do this game justice.  The jokes themselves are more or less done in the vein of new enemy types. Sure the birds themselves might elicit a funny, and confused feeling. But these will get you much closer to the feelings you might have had upon seeing Parodius, or Zombie Nation for the first time. The surprise, combined with the silliness results in a rather satisfying payoff.

There are Angels, there are Wishing Trolls. But funnier yet are the Easter Egg characters. The aliens from Taito’s Space Invaders, and the Vector drawn rocks from Atari’s Asteroids both make an appearance. The game even takes a shot at Karate Champ at one point. Which is strange since that game isn’t a vertical shooter.

You might ask yourself, “What about how it plays? Surely the comedic veneer is going to wear thin eventually.” Which is a good concern, and query to have. Yes, eventually the joke sprites will get old. That can take a while depending on your skill. Because again, you have to survive long enough to make it to the absurd waves. Galaxibirds is challenging. Easily as challenging as the very games from Namco, Atari, and others that it openly mocks.

Each wave of course is going to be a different enemy type. It works like most shooters of the Space Invaders era. You can move left, and right firing ahead of your ship. Every wave you complete displays a flag in the corner. Every ten flags results in a bigger flag. You start the game with three ships, and keep playing until your ships are eventually destroyed. After so many points, you can earn a new ship. But ultimately, it is a game about high score. You can also play a two player mode with each player alternating the joystick between deaths.

The game has pretty good hit detection, and movement too. So in most cases when you die, you really only have yourself to blame.  One thing to remember is that as in Galaxian you cannot fire a second shot until your blast either kills an enemy or reaches the top of the screen. You can hold down the button to keep shooting, but advanced players are going to rapidly press the button. Why? because it’s faster. Other times you might be better off not shooting, and waiting to have the perfect shot while avoiding birds.

Galaxibirds also adds the concept of movement patterns to its game play. Those of you well versed in bullet hell shmups will pick this up a little bit easier. But those who stopped playing these types of games after Galaga will have something to learn. If you can memorize or anticipate the positions that enemies will take during the game, it gives you a huge advantage as avoiding a crash is important. It’s one of the things that makes this budget game impressive. Combining elements of newer shmups, like enemy patterns to the Golden Age game play of early shmups. It is by no means the best shooter on the Commodore 64. Between Hewson’s many games, and excellent ports of games by Irem, Capcom, Konami, and Sega there is much to choose from.

But don’t let that dissuade you from at least trying this game. It isn’t often a comedy game is made well enough to be fun after the jokes stop being funny. The rockabilly chip tune that plays during the game is a nice touch too. If you’re worried you won’t ever make it to the most bizarre stuff, don’t worry.  The programmers actually hid a God Mode Cheat Code in the credits. And while this will certainly erase any challenge, it lets you at least see the crazy stuff for yourself. Keep playing in this mode, and you’ll start all kinds of zany events the developer probably never anticipated. Changing graphics, artifacts, scores rolling back to zero, among many other weird things. It would be an awe-inspiring moment to find someone who could get that far legitimately.

In short: if you love old school quarter munchers, and esoteric comedy, Galaxibirds might be the game for you.

Final Score: 6 out of 10

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